Jeanne Tripplehorn 06.10.1963

Memory

Feeling Jealous, Stressed or Moody? Get over it! Or You Might be at Increased Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

1.26.15

A recent study from Sweden published in the scientific journal, Neurology, provides evidence of a link between certain personality traits and risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The scientists followed 800 middle-aged women for about 40 years and measured their self-reported personality traits and stress levels. They found that a perfect storm of anxiety, jealous tendencies, moodiness and prolonged stress appears to be associated with doubling the risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

 

What’s the connection? Remember how anxiety and stress affect our thinking? The researchers in this study suggest that our personality, thoughts and behaviors dictate our lifestyle choices and how we manage stress. Anxiety and stress affect the hippocampus, that important little structure in our brains that’s responsible for memory, and also happens to be an early target of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

How do you change your personality or  stress level?   You can work with a psychologist to help you better understand your personality, how it affects your health, and to develop stronger coping strategies. You can also check out these stress management tips!

Anxiety

Stress Reduction

Stress Reduction Tip #1

 

Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease:

USC Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center

Video: What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

 

Brain Games: Can they fix my memory?

9.27.14

I hear it almost every day: my patients LOVE Sudoku and Luminosity. They just beam with pride while sharing how much they’ve improved their brain game, well, game. They see the increases as proof that they are “training” their brains, “using it rather than losing it,” and “getting smarter” but I’m not so sure.

 

They’re getting better at the games but are they truly improving their day-to-day attention and memory skills?

 

According to a recent article in the New York Times – the research is unclear, “while players do get better, the increase in skill hasn’t been shown to transfer to other tasks…it doesn’t make you better at math or help you remember names or where you left your car keys.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is encouraging research in the area so we should have some answers soon.

 

Meanwhile , the good news is that we DO know that aerobic exercise is good for the brain – it actually creates new brain cells!

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Juegos del cerebro: ¿Pueden arreglar mi memoria?


La oigo casi todos los días: mis pacientes encanta jugar Sudoku y Luminosity. Me dicen con tanto orgullo lo mucho que han mejorado sus puntajes. Ellos ven estos aumentos como prueba de que están “entrenando” sus cerebros y “volviéndose más inteligentes”, pero no estoy tan seguro.

 

Están mejorando en los juegos, pero son realmente mejorando sus habilidades de atención y de memoria?

 

Según un artículo reciente en el New York Times – los resultados de las investigaciones no son claras “, mientras que los jugadores mejoran, el aumento de la habilidad no se ha demostrado que transferir al otras tareas … que no te hace mejor en matemáticas o ayuda a recordar los nombres o dónde dejó las llaves del auto “. Los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH) está alentando investigaciones en el área, así que deberíamos tener algunas respuestas pronto.

 

Mientras tanto, la buena noticia es que estamos seguros de que el ejercicio aeróbico es bueno para el cerebro – que en realidad crea nuevas células cerebrales!

 

Green Movement: Take Your Mushy Mind Outside

9.23.14

shutterstock_girl-in-nature When I’m faced with a mental roadblock or just feeling a bit fuzzy upstairs, I take a walk.  Afterwards, I usually feel more relaxed and clear headed. Little did I know that my cognitive functioning was also improving! A recent study in Psychological Science reported that cognitive functioning improves after people interact with nature.  They had their participants do a complex mental task involving memorizing a list of things and mentally changing the order of the items around. Then half of the participants went on a walk through a park while the other half walked through an urban setting (downtown Ann Arbor). When they came back, they repeated the tests. Lo and behold, scores of those who walked through the park significantly improved while those of the city walkers didn’t. Oh, it gets better. Those of you without easy access to nature need not despair, because it turns out that they got the same effect using pictures of nature versus pictures of urban settings!

 

As you may have already noticed, menopause doesn’t just wreak havoc on your body, but your mind, too. So the next time you find yourself in a mental fog, take a hike!

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Movimiento Verde: Lleve su Mente Afuera


Cuando me enfrento a una barricada mental o me siento un poco borrosa en la cabeza, salgo a caminar. Después, usualmente me siento más relajado y lúcido. Yo no sabía que mi funcionamiento cognitivo también está mejorando! Un reciente estudio en Psychological Science reportó que el funcionamiento cognitivo mejora después de contacto con la naturaleza. Los participantes hicieron una tarea mental complejo que incluye la memorización de una lista de palabras y cambiando mentalmente el orden de las palabras. Luego la mitad de los participantes fueron en un paseo por un parque, mientras que la otra mitad de paricipantes caminaban por un ambiente urbano (centro de Ann Arbor). Cuando regresaron, todos repetieron las pruebas. Sorprendentemente, los resultados de los participantes que caminaron por el parque mejoraron significativamente mientras que las resultados de los otros que caminaron en la ciudad no mejoraron. Si usted no tiene fácil acceso a la naturaleza, no se preocupe. Los investigadores consiguieron el mismo efecto usando imágenes de naturaleza contra las imágenes de los entornos urbanos!


Como usted pudo haber notado, la menopausia no sólo provoca cambios problemáticas con su cuerpo, sino también con su mente. Así que la próxima vez que te encuentres en una niebla mental, vaya a caminar al aire libre!

A Natural Remedy for Hot Flashes?? If you live in the LA area you might want to be part of this study.

10.22.12

How Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain: Not Saying We Told You So

4.20.12

 

More news about how exercise is so great for your brain!

 

Check out this week’s New York Times Magazine for a great piece on how exercise can actually make you smarter! Yes, even for those of us with Menopaused Minds!


More Menopause Mind Proof: Study Finds Cognitive Fog During Menopause Is Real, But Complicated

3.17.12

A recent study published in the journal Menopause, reports that women do experience some cognitive difficulties during menopause. Specifically, the troubles lies within the domains of attention and working memory, when you’re holding bits of information in your head to use immediately.  Hooray for validation!

 

The study actually shows that women in menopause who have the cognitive complaints also have trouble sleeping and/or report symptoms of depression.  Menopause has been known to set sleep and mood off kilter, which may be how menopause leads to mind fogginess.  But lots of questions remain to be answered by more research, including factors associated with disrupted cognitive functioning, sleep, and mood.

 

At the very least, when you’re telling family or friends that you’re mind has become mush, you have proof to back it up!