Jeanne Tripplehorn 06.10.1963

Posts Tagged ‘stress management’

Feeling Jealous, Stressed or Moody? Get over it! Or You Might be at Increased Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

1.26.15

A recent study from Sweden published in the scientific journal, Neurology, provides evidence of a link between certain personality traits and risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The scientists followed 800 middle-aged women for about 40 years and measured their self-reported personality traits and stress levels. They found that a perfect storm of anxiety, jealous tendencies, moodiness and prolonged stress appears to be associated with doubling the risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

 

What’s the connection? Remember how anxiety and stress affect our thinking? The researchers in this study suggest that our personality, thoughts and behaviors dictate our lifestyle choices and how we manage stress. Anxiety and stress affect the hippocampus, that important little structure in our brains that’s responsible for memory, and also happens to be an early target of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

How do you change your personality or  stress level?   You can work with a psychologist to help you better understand your personality, how it affects your health, and to develop stronger coping strategies. You can also check out these stress management tips!

Anxiety

Stress Reduction

Stress Reduction Tip #1

 

Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease:

USC Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center

Video: What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

 

Coming Soon: Stress Reduction Techniques

3.5.12

Okay,  okay, stress is BAD! Bad for the body and bad for the brain – I get it!  But I’m busy! Don’t lecture me about doing yoga or meditating – it just increases my stress. And what is this new kind of meditation everyone is talking about – Mindfulness? I’m suppose to relieve my stress by focusing on the moment? Unless the moment includes a momentous margarita it’s not gonna happen. Hmm, Margarita Mindfulness – now that sounds promising.

 

Last night I ranted to Lina (my blog partner and psychotherapist) about this new form of Mindfulness Meditation and her response was simple: maybe it’s not for me. Each person has to find their own stress-reduction method.  What works for one person can drive another one batty.

 

But stress reduction IS important and it’s important to find one that works for you, or at least give some news methods a shot. We’ll be starting a series of posts on a variety of stress reduction techniques and we encourage you to find one you like. We’ll talk about exercise, yoga, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, old fashion meditation, and of course, the new hot topic, Mindfulness.  We’ll also talk about ways to motivate yourself to reduce your stress and preserve your menopause mind.

 

Meanwhile, if you have any stress-reduction tips (that don’t include food, tequila or anything illegal) let us know.